Blender 29 Beginner Tutorial Part 2 Sword

in part two of the blender fast track series we're going to build out our sword if you are new to blender there will be a link in the description to part one of the series which is designed for a complete beginner in part two we're going to get up to speed with the basics of polygon modeling then we will go step by step on how to build out our sword asset we'll go through the basics of uvs learn the basics of textures and shader nodes for me 3d modeling was a real struggle when i first started which is why we at cgfastrack.com are super passionate about really simplifying the process and building the courses that we wish we had when we first started if you would like to get to know my experience there'll be a link in the description to my demo reel and with that said let's get going [Music] here's where we're headed we're going to start modeling out this gear and this is going to be a nice warm up before we get to our sword object in part one we avoided hotkeys to make it easier to get up and running with blender now we're getting to more intermediate levels and we want to start implementing these and this is going to start speeding up our workflow drastically we already went over the viewport navigation so you should be comfortable at this point with that one the stuff that we're going to go over right now is going to be the move rotate and scale so what are those so we have g r and s right here this is going to be what we have over here right it's just a little bit different so g to move so you notice as soon as you hit g we can move it around and then we can drop it with another click so g will attach it to your cursor and then click to drop just like that so it's a three-step process g move it around click to drop and then we have the same thing r for rotation click the drop and then s for scale click the drop now you notice that it's really really hard to move it on a specific axis now i'm going to show you guys the standard way first um personally i don't use it this way and i'll explain that a bit but i'm going to show you guys the standard way first the standard way is to do these snapping tools right here and basically what this is is whenever you hit g we can now activate a snapping mode which is x y or z which is going to be snapping it to a specific coordinate axis now for me this isn't an easy thing to do my brain doesn't really like to do this um i encourage you to practice this another option that we have here is use a middle mouse button so we have g and then we can do middle mouse button and hold to snap it to a specific axis as well and this is going to be consistent with rotation as well like this scaling as well middle mouse button or we can use the xyz snap now the way i like to do is with the lazy viewport add-on which is a custom add-on we built at cg fasttrack there will be a link it down in the description for this as well um it's just github.com for slash cg fast track four slash lazy viewport and then what we do is we just go to code and then we just do download zip file like that and then from here wherever you have your downloads just right click it and then you just do extract all i'm just going to go ahead and extract that and then we dive into the side of that folder and there'll be this lazyviewport.pi so i'm going to go ahead and copy that path i'm going to go back to blender and go to edit and then preferences so we haven't jumped in here but we'll be touching up on this as we go we'll go down to the add-ons tab right here and we'll just go to install right up here and then we'll go ahead and navigate to our lazy viewport.pi and then we'll just do install add-on so an add-on is just a plug-in for blender it's a very very common there's a ton of free ones out there this one's free as well we'll need to search for our lazy viewport right here and then just go to click on enable right here now what does that do why do i like to use that basically now our g r and s right here these hotkeys right now now work with our viewport tools that we've been using over here so g to move r to rotate s to scale very very simple now this is a personal preference i like to use this just because it keeps both my mouse and my hand busy whereas the other way is kind of keyboard heavy so i can essentially do two operations at once and this way as well i don't have to necessarily remember which coordinate i need just to rotate around right it's much much more visual again that's a personal preference i definitely encourage you to play around with the snapping mode versus lazy v-port see what works well for you the next three hotkeys we want to get to know down here are going to be frame selected so this one is another standard one that i don't use much and this is number pad period and that's just going to be to zoom in like this the reason why i don't use this as well is because again we have to take our hand off the keyboard just to zoom in on something and we're going to be using this one a lot right so the way i like to do this i use the the tilde key we're not going to introduce that yet just to keep it simple a simple way to utilize this is to go to view and then frame selected and then what we can do here is just right click and then add to quick favorites so right click add to quick favorites right there and then what we have here is now our quick favorites which is right here as q that's going to open up a menu and then we just click that so we can just do cue click cue click and it's going to frame selected so now we don't have to take our hand off the mouse because we're going to be really really fast um it'll be an easy way for us to get up to speed with moving around very very quickly while we're modeling and then the last thing we want to get to know is just x so we just select this and we want to delete it we just hit x now before you move on to the next chapter you want to practice each one of these hotkeys really make sure that you're comfortable with all of these viewport tool hotkeys before moving on just go through each one download the hotkey sheet practice with it a few times maybe try making the minecraft scene again with these hotkeys and with that said in the next chapter we're going to start taking a look at edit mode so edit mode is going to be basically how we take a basic primitive shape and turn it into something a little bit more customized so this process is going to be called modeling and the first thing that we're going to deconstruct is just object mode versus edit mode so first off there's going to be a couple more hotkeys that we're going to get to know um we'll cover these as we go but these will be in the hotkey cheat sheet so the first hotkey we want to get to know is tab and you notice that tab changes object mode up here into edit mode so what's the difference between these two things so long story short object mode if we move things around we're going to be moving around the object and in edit mode if we move things around you notice if i select right here i can now move the actual points on the object so one's going to be editing is going to be modifying the object and then object mode is going to be moving the object itself so two different things happening there so we can switch between this by simply doing the pull down menu here object mode edit mode i'm primarily going to be using the hotkey tab to do this the next step we have here is the selection mode right here so this is going to be something very new we have vertices we have edges and we have faces these are the three different components that make up of any mesh inside a blender we have vertices over here and then we have edges right there so we can move around individual edges and then we have faces just like this and we can move around individual faces like that now these hotkeys are also going to be on our hakee chichi so to switch between vertex edge and face we're going to use the hotkeys one two and three so tab to switch between object mode edit mode one two three to switch between vertex edge and face so one vertices move those two edges move those three faces move those now you also notice when we go from object mode to edit mode will be two different menus we get this menu right up here and then this menu right here these are going to be where are we doing our modeling operations which is what we're going to be talking about next the three most common modeling operations that we're going to do are going to be extrusions insets and loop cuts so inside of our edit mode over here we'll notice that we have this menu up here in this menu down here so this is going to be where we're doing modeling operations so what's the difference between these two you can think of this down here as a shortcut for what we find in here right so if we come up here we can see that we have you know faces all the stuff edges all this stuff vertex all this stuff and then these in here all these buttons on here are going to be somewhere in here so you can think of these as the most common operations going to be over here the ones that we're going to use the most the first one we'll talk about is going to be extrusion right there so what i'm going to do is select my face right here so i'm selecting faces right now and i'm going to activate my extrude tool and then what we get is this little handle right here and if i move this up like this this is an extrusion operation we're basically taking that one polygon and extruding it forward the next one up we're going to have here is going to be the inset tool so we're going to activate that and then if i click and drag on this like this we'll see that okay that's going to be our instant tools basically taking those polygons and insetting them in and the next up we have a loop cut right here i'm going to go ahead and do it one more extrude upwards like this and then activate my loop cut so loop cut if we highlight hover over an edge like this we'll see that okay we now get this highlighting action here and if we just click it'll just confirm a loop cut on that we can also do a click and drag like this just like that so this is an opportunity just to work on the default cube what i would do is just kind of go through and just practice you know maybe select some faces go to your extrude region and maybe extrude them things out just play around get really dirty we're gonna model out the gear in the next chapter but get some practice just moving some things around um getting messy and just pushing things around and we'll start modeling out the gear next so we're going to take a basic cylinder shape and turn it into this gear shape right here so back where we left off i'm going to go and switch over to object mode up here by hitting tab and then i'm just going to hit x to delete and then confirm delete now whenever we're starting with modeling we want to start with the closest primitive shape possible so if we go up to our add menu right here go over to mesh we can add a basic primitive mesh so we have spheres we have cylinders we have tauruses the one that's going to be matching us for the gear is going to be our cylinder right here now as soon as we drop that in before you touch anything else we have this adjust last operation menu down here so if you click off like this and you don't see it anymore you'll have to reset so the operation menu is adjust last operation so i'm going to delete the cylinder go ahead and add mesh and then cylinder now while this is active so while this is active up here we'll go up here and go to vertices and change this to 12 right there and then you'll see what happens here is we now just adjusted the sides of our cylinder right there so instead of having 32 edges we're going to have 12 to start with so we'll be using this modeling last operation menu a lot as we go so i'm in object mode right here i'm going to go over to edit mode by hitting tab and then what i'm going to do is jump into my scale mode so i have everything selected as we have another hotkey here we have two more hotkeys here we have selection with a and d select with double a so a to select all double a to select nothing a to select all double a to select nothing so i'm just going to hit a to select everything hit s to jump into my scale mode and then scale this down like this so we want to get that base gear shape like that now we want to do is delete the top and the bottom sides so i'm going to go in my face selection up here by hitting three select my face then hit x and then delete face right there there we go so we'll do the same thing so while face is selected up here select our face hit x and then delete faces like that and there we go now we need to extrude this out to create the base shape so i'll select everything by hitting a or you just click and drag like this and then what we need to do here is extrude this out so if i go to my extrude tool and extrude this out you'll notice okay that's not what we want right so what we want to do is undo out of that and click and hold on this so what we want to do is go to strewed along normals what is extruded along normal so basically extrude along normals is saying okay whatever the polygon direction is perform the extrusion operation off of that so instead of just going one direction entirely it's going to be going wherever that polygon is facing and a normal is basically where the polygon is facing that's just what that is now what we want to do is another extrusion operation but we'll select this and then we'll go around with our faces and we'll shift select these faces so shift selection all the way around just like that there we go and then what we'll do is we'll do another extrude along normals just like that click and drag just like that great so we're getting close so we'll start talking about our subdivision modifier next so we're gonna go from here to there with our subdivision and basically what subdivision do is just a way of smoothing out our object we're going to take a look at modifiers this time so modifiers the modifier tab is going to be right here and the reason why these are so important is because they're a non-destructive way to work inside a blender when it comes to modeling operations and non-destructive basically means you know if we want to undo that original extrusion that we did to make this thick we can't really do that without having to like you know undo a bunch of times and then come back and then redo it so you can think of non-destructive as procedural as a way to be able to modify it after you apply the operation now while we're going to be working with our modifiers we can just jump back out into object mode we don't need to be in edit mode so these are going to be things that we apply on top of our object and if we go up here and select this and then we come over here and we'll just go to our subdivision right here subdivision surface you notice our object now gets smooth so let's break down what's happening here i'm going to tab back into edit mode and then tab back and forth between object and edit mode so we'll see that while we're in edit mode we're going to see this cage mesh that is our original mesh and then the final result is what we're going to see right here right so this is our cage mesh this is our subdivided mesh now the reason why this is so important is because we can simply now click this little x button right there we can remove that subdivision modifier and we can reapply it any time we want right so it's going to be an operation on top of our model and then what we can do here is if we go back into edit mode if we wanted to do something like with all of these selected what we can do is simply do another extrusion we can do another extrude along normals and you can see here now we can model with the subdivision surface on top of it which is really really cool this is one of my favorite areas of blender comparing it to other 3d applications like maya for example super super powerful so the subdivision surface modifier let's break down what we see over here at the top row right here we have the ability to enable and disable depending on which location we're in so the first one is going to be our display cage mesh for the most part i have this off all the time this is going to disable that just so i can model with my cage mesh on so i'm going to be viewing the cage mesh and modeling based off that next up we have edit mode so if we have that off basically what happens is if we tag a toggle between object mode and edit mode it's only going to be visible in object mode now so we're turning off the ability to see this in edit mode so i'm going to turn that back on and then we have our viewport display or our real-time display so this one's turning off completely so we can't see it inside of the viewport at all if we go to render writer image up here all of a sudden we'll start to be able to see that again and then the last button we have here is display and render so if we hit the render button again or up here we now see okay now it's not going to be displayed in a render so now it's completely turned off so how do we want to work um well for the most part we just leave these by default um i'll be playing around with these as we go and show you guys a couple different techniques on when i use them when i don't and then from here what we do is you know we have just two different options in here we'll have levels in the viewport and then render so that is basically what this means is how much do we want to see in the viewport itself i'm gonna put a value of two here and then how much do we actually wanna see when whenever we render render image right here and we're just going to leave that as a value of 2. and there we go last thing we want to talk about is just the smoothing of the normals you notice how our polygons look kind of weird right now they're kind of we see all these different faces if we just simply right click here and then just do shade smooth so we want to make sure that we're in object mode right now so if you notice if i go back to edit mode and right click we don't see that right so right clicking is going to be different depending on if we're in edit mode and object mode so i'm going to object mode right click and shade smooth and that's just going to smoothen all that out great and we're going to take a look at the bevel modifier next so a bevel modifier is basically how we control the edges so you can see here these edges are really soft and really round and then these edges are nice and crisp so that's what a bevel modifier is going to help us do and we can take another look right here with a cube so this is just a simple cube with a bevel modifier put on top of it it's just helping us control how round the edges are so back here in my gear scene um so we can find the bevel modifier inside of our add modifier list over here but before we actually add this we want it to actually happen before we put on the subdivision surface so if we actually put our modifier on here and we go bevel we'll notice that we don't actually see any different in fact it kind of gets worse in the sense that you know we get these faceted edges back right where we can actually see those polygons coming back up and this is happening because the modifier stack works from top down so whatever operation you have up here is going to be applied first and then this operation is going to be applied second and so on and so forth so it's the opposite of what you would expect from like a photoshop stack and then all these operations happen on top of each other so we're going to do here is simply exit out of our subdivision modifier right here and that's just going to allow us to work with the bevel and to be able to see this a little bit better what i'm going to do is come up here to my viewport shaded mode right up there or my wire frame my wire frame mode right here and you know we talked about you know solid mode we talked about rendered mode now we're going to jump into wireframe mode which is good we're going to be getting into this a lot whenever we get into modeling and wireframe and we're going to switch be switching back and forth between wireframe and solid a lot and this is going to help us actually see the cage of our mesh and you can see here what the modifier is doing now if i want to come in here and just toggle on this real time display you can see here's before and after so it's going to be rounding our edges now we have a couple different controls to get to know in here the first one is going to be amount so if we want this to be a little bit brighter we can turn that up so if we do something like you know a value of go all the way up so you can see here that if we go up too high it's actually going to stop that's happening because this length right there is only going to allow it to go so far so if i make this a value of something like 0.1 for example or 0.05 maybe go a little bit lower than that 0.05.01 we can see that we have okay now we're starting to see some results so 0.03 0.05 we can start to see that we have um some changes happening here and the next up we have our segment so how many polygons do we actually want to see if we switch this up to something like three see okay now the edges become even more round right just by boosting up the segments here and then the last thing that we want to get to know is going to be limit method so limit method is basically going to be how we choose this based on an angle i'm going to choose angle right here and basically what that says is based on this angle right here how sharp is it and if it's sharp enough between this angle right here which is 30 degrees it's going to apply the operation so you notice that you know if we turn this off we have this right here and as soon as we switch this over to angle we all suddenly don't have it that's because it's eliminated based on this angles 30 degrees so for example this edge that is being beveled is essentially zero degrees so it's not going to actually find it based on this value now if we go up on this something like 60 for example you notice these edges get shut off because this is a you know less than that 60 degree angle and we can go higher something like 80 um i think 80 60 will probably be the same result but essentially this is going to be a 90 degree angle right here so for us setting that to 80 degrees right there that's going to be us telling blender only do sharp corners and then leave the rest alone which is exactly what we want in this specific case now if we go over to solid mode again up here what we can see here if we now drop in our subdivision modifier we now get a nice smooth surface that makes a little bit more sense for what we want i'm just going to go ahead and change the level displays to two and there we go and that's that that's going to wrap it up for the gear so the sword is going to be what we're moving into next and it's going to be you know a good transition but it's going to be a challenge so what you want to do is make sure you're comfortable modeling out this gear so i recommend doing it five different times and continue doing it you know you can follow along with the step-by-step screenshots underneath you down below um and then keep doing this until you can do it by memory you don't need the video you don't need the step-by-step screenshots anymore and after you can do this by memory then you'll be ready to do the sword in the next chapter all right so here's where we're at we're going to start working on our sword model and the very first step is going to be to block in the basic shapes so look at this a little bit closer we're basically just going to block in with some cubes some cylinders and a couple more cylinders and just like you're painting a picture or sketching a sketch we're going to start with our broad strokes and then we'll slowly add in the fine details over here so we're going to work on this now so i'm in a new scene you can just do file new general and basically i got a little preset set up here i'm going to show you really quick but i have my sword in here i'm going to keep this in here just to reference just so i can point out what we're going to be doing you don't need to have this in your scene um you can start with a fresh scene and you'll be good to go so i'm going to give you guys the basics of the measurements that we're going to use feel free to though to experiment scale this in scale it down all that good stuff if you want to follow along exactly i'm going to be giving you my exact value so over here in our transform properties over here we're going to do a scale of 0.04 0.015 and then 0.0 and then 0.605 so how did i come up with those measurements this is just from what i originally prepped is so if you want to follow along exactly those will be the values now we're going to add in this basic cylinder right there we're going to start with the cylinder and then we're basically going to take this and then extrude it off of that so we'll go ahead and add in a cylinder so we'll go add mesh and then cylinder and then we want to make sure that our cylinder up here we're going to start with in this adjust loss properties action we're going to do a value of 10 verts and then we're going to scale this down we're going to do .043 point zero two five and then point zero two right there and then we're gonna move this up in the z axis we're going to do 0.625 and that'll just make it sit right up there great so that's going to be our guard we'll have our handle right there so go ahead and add object we'll do mesh then we'll do cylinder so same values that we're going to use from before 10 vertices is going to be fine for this and then what we're going to do is we're going to set this to be 0.016 for x y and z for the scale and then we're going to move this up in z and that's going to be 0.745 and i'm going to go ahead and frame select it on that and then then z here we're going to do is just do a value of 0.105 for the scale next up we have our paul ml cylinder right here so we're going to add another cube or another center we'll do mesh and then add cylinder and then the values for these are going to be 0.88 and the z and then we're going to do 0.13 0.013 0.013 and then .038 in the z and that'll be good for that we'll zoom in and make sure that that's all good to go that's looking good and then the last thing that we have to do is just do another cylinder for this one up here and then we'll go ahead and add a cylinder for the tip right here so i'll do add a drop mesh and we'll do cylinder and the values for this are going to be a value of 0.02 for the scale and then the z axis will be 0.94 and then we're going to rotate this 90 degrees in x so it's going to be rotated this way right here so that's going to be it for blocking this in in the next chapter we're going to start blocking in the handle right here and again you don't have to follow these exact steps but if you want to follow along they're all right there for you so we're going to start modeling out the handle next so we're going to work on our handle right here and we're going to go from here all the way over here specifically adding all these grooves and all of that all those fine details so before we get going i want to show you guys the concept of applying transforms i have two different objects over here and the problem is is that we have went in here and on the object level we have scaled these right and that's not a problem if you know what you're doing but right now if we just jump into edit mode and start making a bunch of operations we're going to run into a lot of issues so i have a example over here to show you what that means so you can see over here this bevel right here that's a problem and it's looking fine over here but it doesn't look fine over here that's because this right here the scale values are one one one and then this one right here this one's has a scale value just like all of our objects now what's happening here is this has a bevel operation on it and just like any modeling operation the modeling operation happens underneath the object transform so it's happening underneath this so what that means is this bevel right here is getting stretched like this right so in order to fix that what we have to do is just simply to go to objects apply and then scale so basically before we do any modeling operations um we always want to apply the scale and there you see that we have the bevel's not fixed so long story short um scale value should always be at one before we start modeling i'm going to go ahead and get rid of these two examples so to get going i'm going to go ahead and zoom in here on the frame selected and then i'm going to go ahead and go jump into edit mode and what i'm going to do here is before i get going i want to scale this in so you can see here how this is a little bit tapered this way just like that like a triangle we want to apply that same thing happening here so you'll notice that when we're in object mode we have our q frame selected but whenever we go into edit mode we miss that so in edit mode i'm going to do is go ahead and add that so to view right click and add to quick favorites on that so i can jump around pretty easily in edit mode too so cue frame selected right there so what i want to do here is jump into my edit mode by hitting two select my edge here and then what we're going to do is select and then we're going to do loops and then select edge loops what an edge loop is is basically a loop around whatever those edges are connected it's going to select that as well i'm going to jump into my scale and then i'm going to bring this in like this something right in there and then i'm going to do the opposite for this down here so i'm going to jump in white wireframe mode go to my edge mode by hitting 2 select that right here and then do select loops edge loops and then we're going to get and scale that up just like that so now we have a little bit of that tapering happening i'm going to go back into my solid mode and what i'm going to do now is add in some loop cuts to do the bevels right here these these engravings right there so cue frame selected so we can get back in here quick and then we're going to do loop cut and i'm just going to click right there now i'm going to open up my adjust last action properties i want to do is set this loop cuts i'm going to drag that up and i'm going to set that to a value of 15. i'm going to make sure my factor is also set to a value of 0. now what i'm going to do is go back in my move tool or my scale tool up here i'm going to collapse that and what we want to do is now deselect every other one of these now the way we do these selections on these if we go into edge tool i'm going to go ahead and alt click on this like this and that's going to select one loop and then what we can do here is if we do alt shift click we can now go every other one just like this so this is the same thing that we did up here with the select the selected jups but now we're going to do with the shortcuts so shift alt click and we'll do every other one and i'll go into my wireframe make sure that's good there we go so now what we want to do is scale this out so i'm going to not do this because that's going to do three different directions what i'm going to do here is just scale this out like this and then we're going to set the resize value of just being like 1.2 and 1.2 so just in the x and y now we're going to do the opposite for the inner loops so we'll go into edge mode we'll do all click to just select one then we'll do alt shift click to select the next ones right there so we'll keep going up just like that go into my wireframe so i can see a little bit better there we go and then we'll go ahead and scale this in so i'm going to scale on one axis and then while my adjustable selection properties are up we're going to do 0.9 and 0.9 there we go so now i'm going to go and add in my subdivision modifier so i'm going to add modifier and then do subdivision now if we look in object mode now if we just do right click shade smooth we have a couple different problems one of which if i just move this out over here a little bit uh one we're getting like this weird thing right there so we got a one fixed app so i'm going to go to object mode here and i'm going to go into my face selection by hitting three and then select that face up there i'm gonna go ahead and get rid of that by any x and then delete faces there we go so that's not going to cave in on itself anymore and i'm going to do the same thing down here and if i can't see it what we can just do and go into wireframe mode and then again it can be a little bit hard to see but basically the faces in wireframe mode if we look they have little dots in the middle so we what we want to do is select that dot which we'll select that full polygon and then x and then delete faces just like that and then we'll go back into object mode i'm going to go back into my solid mode i'm going to reset this so move that back i'm just going to do 0 and x and now the last thing that we want to do is crease or add some holding edges right here in the center so you can see here with the other one here we have this one which is basically it's doing this thing right there um it's not doing this right so the way we do that is by simply adding in a bevel to this i'll zoom in here object mode and then what i'll do here is go into my wireframe mode and then what we can do to see this a little bit better is just turn off subdivision in edit mode and then we'll just go to edge mode and then select edge loop by alt left click and then we'll do all the way up again just like that so we have all those edges selected and what we want to do is add in a holding edge there and we can do that by adding a bevel so we've added bevel modifier before but we're now we're going to add in a bevel on the actual geometry itself while our edge loops are selected we'll go over to our bevel tool right here we'll go ahead and click that and then if i just click and drag this up you'll see okay now we get to those edges so beveling and basically we're just taking one single edge and making more edges from that very very simple there we go and then i'm going to go and jump into tab mode jump back into my solid mode and there we go that's looking pretty good and then last thing that we want to do is we just want to jump back into edit mode i'm going to select everything by heading a and we're just going to scale this in so it's a little bit flatter on one side so i'll jump into my scale mode by hitting s and then drag this in on one axis right there and i'll just do something like a value of 0.9 on that maybe 0.85 actually just to shrink that in a little bit there we go now it's going to be a little bit more of an oval than a circular shape okay so that's our handle and in the next chapter we'll start modeling out the guard for me the toughest part about learning 3d modeling when i first started was following along with the video it was very easy to miss this button very easy to miss that button and before you know you have to stop rewind and struggle to find just the next step to the process this is a brutally exhausting process which is why we at cgfastrack.com built the step-by-step screenshot application and we put it into every single one of our courses this would have saved me so much time and frustration and makes it so much easier and enjoyable to learn 3d animation after you're done watching the video here on youtube click the link in the description and follow along there so we're going to start working on our guard specifically taking our cylinder from here to here and this is going to take a couple different chapters so we want to focus on right now is just getting this initial extrusion set up and we're going to run into a little bit of problems along the way so i'm going to break it down so i'm going to go ahead and select my cylinder cue frame selected so we can work on this a little bit and i'm going to go ahead and just go into edit mode and i'm going to go ahead and face mode over here by d3 select this and we'll do our initial extrusion i'll go ahead and select my extrude make sure i'm on extrude region and go ahead and click and drag that out just like that and i'll go ahead and just jump into my move tool move this out jump into my scale tool and scale this in and then just a little bit in here like this and we're just going to move this down like that now we want to set up our subdivision our bevel and all of that as we work so we can constantly check and make sure everything's working together so what i'm going to do here is go to my modifier stack and just add in a bevel modifier so we can see what we're doing here and then what we're going to do is we're going to change the limit method over to angle which will prevent areas like this so we're going to set this up to something like a value of 60. so that's going to prevent you know areas like this from getting beveled so it's just going to bevel the edge right here which is exactly what we're looking for we're going to set the bevel amount to something like .05 we'll do segments of value f3 and there we go so now we're getting pretty close and you'll notice here that we have a problem so here as well this is getting stretch this bevel on the top looks different than that and if you can remember what we talked about we need to apply our transform so go ahead and go back into object mode while this is selecting go to object and then apply and then scale and then you'll see okay all of a sudden our bevel is way different so super important to remember to do that each time we jump into a model and i'll just do 0.01 or i'll go a little bit lower on this i'm just going to click and drag on this do something like zero zero one for that point zero zero one segments of three is looking good great and then what we'll do now is set up our subdivision surface so that all of this stuff gets smoothed out so add modifier we'll do subdivision surface now we run into this really bad problem right here which all this stuff happening right here and essentially what's happening right here is that there's no holding edge that's one problem and then another problem that we're going to run into is this n-gone up here and if i jump into edit mode up here and i can see here okay this is a quad this is a quad i'm going to go ahead and disable these things in edit mode i'm going to turn this off this off so we see a little bit better so this is a quad because it has four sides right so one two three four um quads are good the quads are what we want most of the time we're going to be getting into this kind of stuff a little bit more in depth than a different course specifically blender fundamentals but long story short this is this face up here is an ngon which means it has more than four sides which means we don't want that right so we need to fix that and add a holding edge on there as well holding edge being an edge that's going to go on both sides right here now to do this what we're going to do is drop in an inset both on the top and the bottom so i'll select faces select this right here and then shift select right here and then while i'm going to wireframe so i can see this little bit better and then while this is here i'm going to do inset like this and then click and drag right there now you can see okay now we have a holding edge right there and then we're going to click and drag this again and then one more time again and now what we'll do is simply merge those faces together so we're going to end up with triangles so i'll select this face right there i'll go to mesh and then merge merge up here and then we'll do merge at center and it's a little bit hard to see but now they're going to be triangles and to see this a little bit better what i'm going to do is jump into my solid mode up here i'm going to move this out here a little bit more so we can see this and then if i jump into edit mode again we can see a little better so now we have a triangle one two three so triangles are okay generally speaking on flat surfaces again we're not trying to be too picky right now we're just trying to make something that is going to be our first project so it's okay if it's a little rough around the edges so we'll select the bottom face now and then we'll do mesh merge and then at center there we go now whenever we jump out of tab and we can see this all being taken place together now it's going to be okay now that's looking better specifically if we right click and do shade smooth now you can see okay that's looking a lot better and i'm just going to go back into my object mode here and then zero out this transform to reset that back there we go and then i'm just going to go to my modifier stack here and then we can just go ahead and change the level of the viewport to two so now we're all we basically have our base set up so what we're going to do now and the next one is set up our mirror modifier so that we only have to model this on one side so the mirror modifier is going to automatically take one side and copy it to the other so let's take a look on how to set that up first off we need to hack off one side so i'll go back into my edit mode here and i'll go ahead and just select all these faces and a good way to do this is just by going to wireframe mode select our faces and then we'll just click and drag like this i'm just going to make sure i have my move tool selected so i don't accidentally perform a modeling operation here and then we'll just hit x and then we'll do delete faces there we go so now we have one side now what we want to do is add a modifier and then do mirror just like that and by default it's going to be all good just to give you a tour of the mirror modifier basically the most important attribute that we want to make sure setup right is going to be this access and how you know that's set up right is basically right now it's we need a mirror on the x-axis and you can see the x-axis right here right so we need to flip it on this side right there so as long as you're following along exactly that should work but you might have to switch it over to like z or y for example and that'll do the other axis i'm going to leave it on x now if we go into edit mode here and then go back into solid mode here we can see that we have a problem and specifically there's going to be this pinching thing happening there so what is that about basically what's happening here is this merge mod or this mirror modifier is operating last it's operating after the bevel after the subdivision and then it's basically you know just the subdivision the way it works is it's going to pinch like that so to fix this what we want to do is drag and drop this all the way up to the top and this is a new blender 2.9 thing so if you're from if you're working in 2.8 you won't be able to drag and drop there'll be arrow buttons up there to go up and down so you can see there before after so that's what we're after great and then if we go into edit mode again and if we simply just select a face over here so i'm going to go in three select the face and then move up and down like that you can see that is going to automatically be applied to the other side which is exactly what we want great and then in the next chapter we're going to start finishing off the rest of our extrusions so we're going to finish off the rest of the shapes here so to do this what we're going to do is add in a loop cut and then we're going to extrude out so i'm going to go to my loop cut tool click and drag so be really really careful when you're working with the loop cut it's really easy just to click and then forget the drag and then i'm just going to go over to my move tool to get out of this a really really common problem with the loop cup tool if you are working you actually click like that if you do that just ctrl z out of that control z and then immediately just get on to a different tool so what i usually do is just hit g after that which will just make sure that i don't accidentally insert another loop cut just by accidentally clicking and then i'm going to go to my face mode up here by hitting three select this and then what we're going to do is extrude down so i'm going to make sure i have extrude region selected i'm going to click this and then i don't want to do it too far because you can see we're at a weird angle like this so what i'm going to do here is just move this out a little bit like that and then we're going to do here is just go into my move tool just like that so now we're going straight down basically there we go and now we need to the same thing but for this side over here so add in a loop cut so click and drag on that loop cut right there immediately jump into my move tool to get out of the loop cup and then i'm going to jump into my extrusion over here so i'm going to select the front face right here so three for faces and then select that and then again extrude this out and again this one you know it's a little bit tough because we're at that weird angle so what i'm going to do is just extrude out once and then immediately you what you want to avoid doing here is if you wanted to go more you don't want to do that because then we're doing two extrusions so i'm going to undo out of that hit g and then move this out like that and then what i can do is just eye this up so move that down just like that okay so that's looking good we do want to scale this a little bit so we want to taper this in so i'm going to jump into my scale tool so s to scale and then taper that in just like this so the starting point will be thicker and then it's going to end a little bit skinnier and now i want to do is do the same thing here so i want to jump into wireframe mode here and then i'm going to what i'm going to do is go into vert selection and then click and drag right here to select those verts and then do the same thing scale that in just a little bit and then do the same thing for this one right here so drag selection and then scale this in and this is going to be just iron it up just like that so i'm going to jump back into solid mode so we can see this will be better so you can see here now it's thick at the base and then tapered in and skinnier like that at the bottom or at the tip there okay so if we jump back out of edit mode we can see we have a problem here and this is where we get into holding edges once again and we're going to fix this in the next chapter so before we add the holding edges what we need to do is get this shape right here to match this shape currently it's a little too long right here so what i'm going to do is go to my wireframe mode right up here i'm going to go into my move tool go ahead and select all these verts by hitting one select those verts i'm just going to go ahead and move this up like this so that this rests right in there and then what i'm going to do here is just bring this out a little bit more and then just scale this down a little bit more like that and then what i want to do is just thicken this up a little bit more so this thing is going to be a guard so it needs to feel really heavy currently it's feeling a little too skinny so we'll go ahead and scale this out like this just like that and now before we go ahead and start fixing our holding edge so if we go back to solid mode right here and see our issues so we got these issues right here to fix and before we do that what we want to do is make sure that this thing is perfect so go ahead and make any final tweaks right now and this is all looking pretty good i think i'll tweak this part just a little bit so what i'm looking at here is just trying to make sure this line right here and then this line right here are going to be parallel to any final tweaks that you might want to have in here and then we also want to make sure that this is going to be parallel right up here as well so if i come up here and check this out you'll see okay this area right here it's going like this where it's kind of coming in and then it kind of goes down like that so we want this to be a straight line all the way down and what we can do is start utilizing our orthographic views if i go up to view up here we'll go to viewport if i just go up the top right here we now view this just directly at the top view and i'll go up to my wireframe mode up right here and i'll go ahead and select this and then go ahead and scale this ssis scale that up and then right there as well so we want this to be a straight line right here and if we just simply rotate around we can get out of that orthographic view go back into solid mode again and also add in a loop cut so you want to make any final tweaks that you have before you start doing this so i'm going to add my loop cuts i'll go in here loop cut right here and then these are going to be essentially our holding edges and holding edges basically is just going to be a way for this shape to hold its form so i'll continue that up move that up there you go i'll add on each side just like this and there we go and then i'll just tab out of this so we can see that a little bit better you see we're still getting some tearing so go ahead and click and drag right there and then click and drag right up here and there you go so you can see that's starting to look better and then you just want to keep toggling back and forth between tab and edit mode and continue to add your loop cuts until the tears are all going to be removed so go ahead click and drag right there there we go and i'll go ahead and do this side down here and there we go so go ahead and do one final turn around to see how it looks that's looking pretty good i'll go ahead and add in a loop cut up here as well so that this holds its form as well and there we go we'll go ahead and wrap that up right there so we want to start working on the palm mouse specifically what we're going to do right now is work on this part right here so we'll go ahead and select our cylinder up here we'll go into edit mode and then what we want to do is just taper this off at the top so go into edge mode up here we'll do all click and then we'll go ahead and scale this in like that so it's now continuing that same tapered motion and now what we need to do is just delete the top and the bottom here so i'm going to select this face i'm going to come in here select that face hit x delete faces and then do the same thing from the bottom here select that hit x delete faces now what we need to do here is jump into vert mode by hitting one i'll jump into my selection here and i'll select every other one so i'm doing shift click to select all the way around and then what we're going to do is while we're in our scale mode here scale this in like that great and then we're going to do the same thing for the opposite side so i'll select every other one again just the opposite there zoom in here a little bit more and scale that out just like that and now what we can do is just add in that subdivision modifier here so i'm going back into object mode by hitting tab and then modifier add subdivision modifier and then we'll do is just right click shade smooth we'll add another level to the subdivision here that's looking pretty good we'll go ahead and check out this bottom we'll clean this stuff up up in a bit and in the next chapter we're going to start adding the cylindrical shapes that sits right on the top so we're going to add in these taurus shapes that sit right here so if we go into edit mode again we can now add in objects while we're in edit mode so we've been mainly adding in objects while we're in object mode whenever we add in an object in edit mode we're going to be adding geometry to this existing mesh so they're technically going to be one object but they're going to be two different shapes right so if we just do something like this where we add and then do add taurus right there we'll get something like this and the problem with this right now is that it's creating this at the center and we could just manually move it up and all that but we're going to do this little trick with the cursor so i'm going to cue frame selected to jump back in here and i'm going to go into edge mode i'm going to alt click and select that edge loop right there now what i'm going to do here is go to mesh snap and we're going to do cursor to selected so what is cursor cursor is this little thing right there and when you open up blender you know that'll just be hanging out here at the origin because that's where the default location is for things to be created right so whenever we select something and then do mesh snap cursor to selected and snapping that there so the next time that we do mesh and then or add and then we'll do taurus it's now going to be located right there where we have our selection which is really really awesome so we'll be using that quite a bit as we go forward now we want to adjust these tor settings a bit we'll set our major segments to 32 that's just going to lower the resolution of this geometry a little bit we'll do minor segments to eight which is again going to lower that resolution a little bit and then we'll do major radius 0.01 and then minor radius 0.002 and now if we just simply do q frame selected we'll see okay now that's going to be all right there and good to go we can scale it up now if we want to that's looking pretty good i'm just going to leave it there and again all these values came from the first time i built this so these are not just me guessing the right answer you can always just tweak this if you like dragon like that but i'm gonna leave it at the .002 for now and then we're gonna do the same thing for the bottom here so i'm gonna collapse that and then go to my edge mode alt click down here and then we'll do mesh snap and then cursor to selected and then there we go we can see our cursor again is going to be snapped right there again the cursor is up here that's where we find this so if we click and drag right here so if i just click on this if i just move this around now this is going to be where things are being created so if i just do like mesh and then do add tours for example it's going to be made up there i'm going to undo out of that and then just redo this i'll do mesh snap cursor to selected so now this cursor is now moved right there i'm going to jump into g to get out of that and we'll just do mesh or we'll do add we'll do taurus and then we'll just go ahead from here and we'll jump into scale mode and then we'll just go ahead and scale this up so it's wrapping around there like that something like that and to wrap this up i'm just going to make sure that you know we don't see any penetration issues right here so i'm going to go into object mode i'm going to right click shade smooth to get rid of that faceted right there i'm going to go into my handle right here go into uh edit mode go into wireframe and then we'll just edge mode right here all click and then scale this in like that and we'll just tuck this in right here jump out of wireframe into solid mode jump back into edit mode and then there we go great and we'll start working on the tip next so we're going to start working on the tip of our parameter right now so first off before we get on we're going to apply our scale just like we have been doing so go to object apply scale so the last chapter we didn't actually do that on this one and you can see here we still have our scale operations there now we just did very very basic things so we didn't necessarily need to do that there but if i just go ahead and do object apply scale you notice that okay nothing really changed there that's totally fine but whenever we do things like extrusions bevel and sets we definitely want to do that so go here and we'll go ahead and get to work so first step we're going to go into edit mode and what we want to do is block in the front shape just like we're painting a picture or drawing a sketch we want to start with our broad strokes and then we'll slowly work in the fine details so what we want to do here is add in a loop cup loop cut and i'm just going to add in the center click and then go into my properties down here and i want to make sure i'm on one and make sure i'm on zero here so and then we'll just add another one here we'll click and then same thing make sure that we have factor at zero and then a number loop cuts one and then what we'll do is jump out of here we'll jump into scale by hitting s hit three to jump into face mode up here and select that and then we'll just go ahead and select this and scale that in like that great and then what we're going to do is drop in our inset so we're going to do inset right here and then and set that in and then we're going to do is go to marks go to our extrusion and then extrude that in like that and then we'll go ahead and do an inset again before we do that i'm going to go ahead and drop in a subdivision surface or subdivision modifier just so we can see what's happening here a little bit better so add in subdivision modifier and i'm going to jump into my object mode up here right click shade smooth and then jump back down into edit mode now you can see here this isn't holding its shape at all very well so this is where we want to start adding in some holding edges again i'm going to go ahead and turn off subdivision edit mode now we can tab back and forth to see the final result so now i'm going to jump in and grab my inset tool and click and drag right here and then so now that's one holding edge right there if we tab we can see okay now that's holding its shape a lot more and i'm just going to go ahead and get rid of this ngon by clicking and dragging and then clicking and dragging again and then what i'm going to do is just go to mesh merge and then do merge at center so now we have a bunch of triangles which is going to be better in this case except for instead of having that and gotten there great so the shape of this is looking pretty good again when we jump into subdivision mode it's collapsing too much so we want to add in some more holding edges and we can do that with our loop cut tool so i'm going to go ahead and click and drag right here add in a loop up there click and drag there click and drag there i'm going to go ahead and zoom in on this a little bit more click and drag over here and then click and drag right here and then do two on both sides right there and now when we go into edit mode you can see okay now all of that's holding its shape a lot better and if we want to tighten this up a little bit we can always add in a holding edge right there as well jump back out tab i'm going to go ahead and subdivide this a little bit more i'm going to do a value of two so it's going to be smoothing that a little bit more great and then we're going to mirror this next and then finish off the tip in the next chapter so we're going to finish off the very last part of the pommel which is this tip right here so first off we're going to set up our mirror so we have the same on the back that we have on the front so i'm going to go into edit mode i'm just going to go ahead and hack away on this i'm going to jump out of my loop cut tool by hitting g and then go ahead and select my faces jump into my wireframe and then just click and drag to select these right there so we have that loop cut happening right down the middle so that's going to be exactly half so go ahead and select all these and then x delete faces and then we'll go ahead and do add modifier and then we'll do mirror all right so we dropped in the mirror and we don't really see anything happening here that's because we're currently set to x and we need to flip it on this axis right here so how do we know which axis to do well if we look up here it's going to tell us right here and if we see these axis you can see we have z right here x and y and this one's going to be a little bit extra confusing so you would think that we would do y right now right so i'm just going to do y and it doesn't do anything but if we do z it does why is that well this is going to go back to our transforms tool that we were talking about earlier if i go into object mode right now and go over to my transform properties we have a rotation on our x value right so super important to know that we have that now that's totally fine it's not going to you know crash or distort or model in any way but whenever we do mirror operations like this it is going to set it off on the wrong axis so if we do this object apply rotation now it's going to zero out these rotations and now we can essentially apply this modifier in a predictable way so now if we set this to y and turn off x there we go now we're going to be all set up great so we're just going to edit edit mode i'm just going to hit a to select everything and you can see here we're only working with one side now i'm going to jump into my face mode and just select these two right at the top come jump back into my solid mode up here and then i'm just going to do an extrusion so grab my extrude tool and then extrude up like this there we go and now i'll jump into my skill tool and then scale in like this and then i don't want to do this i don't want to scale like this what i want to do is go into my vert selection with one select these two these three right there then go to my move tool and then move this back now if we look at this in object mode we'll see we have a couple different problems specifically this big seam right there so we talked a little bit about this earlier why this happens and basically we have a subdivision modifier happening before our mirror so we want to drag and drop this above there so now we have something like this where we have this really weird seam happening here so what's happening there so anytime i'm in a scenario like this and i'm trying to troubleshoot the best thing to do is start stripping things down and then work backwards from there so specifically we have these two modifiers on so what we want to do is just shut these off i'm going to turn off visibility in the viewport just like that and just kind of investigate and you'll notice that when we go around right here we have topology on the back we have some faces on the back that we need to get rid of so we'll go into tab mode face selection and then we'll select this shift select the other one hit x and then delete faces just like that and then turn those back on view that up that's looking good and then all we have to do is add in our final holding edges so we'll go ahead and drop in our loop cuts right here on this side right there and then that's going to wrap that up for in terms of modifying the mesh and then we're going to jump back into object mode and just do a bird's eye view of how the entire base is looking and you can see okay this is looking pretty thick up here compared to this so i'm going to do is just scale that in so i'm going to scale this in like this so that it's looking a little bit more like the rest of this and then go ahead and bring that down like this something right in there great and then in the next chapter we'll start working on the blade next up we're going to block out the silhouette to our blade so i'm going to jump into edit mode and what i'm going to do down here is just come in here and add in a loop cup right down the center so loop cut right down there and then what i want to do here is make sure that my last action property is right here i want to make sure that the factor is going to be set to zero and that's just going to make sure that it's set right down the center and what i'm going to do here is just go ahead and jump back into my move tool um jump off my loop cut tool right there and then what i'm going to do here is just select these two verts right here so hit one click and drag to select select those verts and what we're going to do is mesh we're going to do merge we're going to do merge at center and we're going to repeat that for each one of these so select these and then we'll do mesh merge at center just like that and we'll go around do the same thing rinse and repeat for each one and now we need to go ahead and do the top as well so go ahead and select these verts up here i'll do cue frame selected and i'll do the same thing for the edge right here so select those mesh merge at center and then we'll do the same thing down here select those mesh merge as center and then down here at the bottom what we want to do is go ahead and sharpen that up so go ahead and add in a loop cut i'll click and drag all the way down somewhere around four fifths down go ahead and close that and then what i'll do here is just go into my first selection here go to my scale tool select these and i want to make sure i have those all selected down here so i'm going to go into my wireframe mode really quick and just select them right there to make sure i have all those that are selected and i'm just going to scale this in and after i scale this i'm going to try to get as close as i can down to be perfectly sharp but what we can do is in our resize menu down here after we do that last action we can just do a value of 0 with this scale now i'll just snap it so that's going to be perfectly sharp go back in my solid mode up here go ahead and zoom that out check that out that's looking pretty good and then in the next chapter we'll start working out the groove so we're going to implement the groove right down the center of our blade so i'm going to come down here just select all this cue frame selected and then i'm going to go ahead and add in some loop cuts right down the center right here so loop cut right here i'll go ahead and just click right there make sure our factor set to zero and then do the same thing over here just click right there and then make sure our factor is set to zero and then we're gonna do is just jump into my wireframe tool right here jump into my scale tool by heading s and we're gonna select these verts right here and just go ahead and scale these in just like that my key frame is selected to zoom in here a little bit more scale those in nice and tight and then what we want to do is select the center one right here it's going to scale those back so that these are going to be flush right there and now we'll go ahead and just work on the top of here so i'll go ahead and select all the way up here cue frame selected and then we have some polygons up here that are sitting up here in the faces so i'll go to three to select those faces select each one of these so i'll select each one by hitting shift left click and then x and then delete faces just to get rid of those at the top go into my vert mode select those right there and then bring those in somewhere around there we want the base to be pretty bulky somewhere right in there and then i'll go ahead and slight select these right here in the middle and go and scale that in like that somewhere right in there and now if i go to my solid mode now we can actually check out see how this is looking overall and that's looking pretty good so now we need to add in those details that live up here at the top go back into edit mode and what we're going to do is add in two more loop cuts so loop cut click and drag all the way up do one right there that's going to be the base of that little groove detail right there and then do another one that's going to be right in here i'm going to go back into my scale mode hit 1 to go in my verts select these at the top keyframe selected to get in there and what we want to do is just go back into wireframe mode and go ahead and select these and go ahead and scale these in like this so the groove detail is essentially going to be welded out down there it's going to start small and then get big and after we scale that in we'll go ahead and just select the center ones right here so key frame selected to get in there's a little bit closer and then select those and then go ahead and move that up like this so we want this to be flush as well so i'm going to go back into my solid mode after we have this selected and we want it to be somewhere right in here where you can see at the top right there we want that to be a perfect triangle like that and then go back into my wireframe mode select these two right in the center and do the same thing just get that as close as possible that we can to making that a triangle somewhere right in there i'll go ahead and look at this in object mode see how that's looking it's looking pretty good so now last steps are just going to be to add a bevel modifier that's just going to make sure that the bevel is going to the sore is going to hold its shape we'll go ahead and add a modifier add subdivision surface as well go into object mode to see what it's looking like we'll just right click shade smooth on that and that's looking pretty good overall so from here you can see okay our edges over here are looking a little soft so if we want to sharpen up any of the edges all we have to do is go back into edit mode over here i'm going to go i'm going to go ahead and collapse my bevel my subdivision go ahead and turn both of those off in edit mode and we'll go ahead and just add in a loop cut down here so we can add a loop cut on the edge right there edge right here just to make those sharper and then we're going to do one for the groove as well one right there and then one right there and i'll go back into scale mode go into object mode and check that out and that's looking pretty good and the last thing that we want to do before we wrap this up if you're having this little issue down here where your tip looks a little black all we need to do is jump into edit mode again and then just add in another loop cut down here and i'll just tighten that up and so it's a little bit sharper so subdivision modifier holds its form a little bit better great and we'll start working on the textures and shaders next so here's where we're headed we're going to take our model and we're going to turn it into our texture and shaded version of this asset and as we move forward the first thing that we're going to need to do is talk about uvs and apply uvs to our model this twitter process is a great visual representation of how uvs work and why we need them so we have our chocolate over here that's representing our 3d mesh and then we have the unwrapped version of that which is going to be represented as their texture and the uvs is basically a flattened version of that 3d object you think of you know your 3d object as your mesh and then your uvs are going to be a 2d version of your object and they're basically the in between stage before you can apply a texture to your material so you think of your mesh as your 3d object and then your uvs as your 2d version of that object and that's what gives us the ability to have this 3d object communicate with the 2d texture this could be a jpeg target whatever it may be and apply it to our 3d mesh so this is what broken uvs look like and this is what we're going to find with our model as well whenever we have like a scrambled uv we get this kind of stuff where we get this weird stretching happening whenever we apply the texture and all of that so let's go ahead and take a look at that now so before we jump into blender we got this uv checkers this is going to be located in the downloads below we're going to be using this to apply as our test texture for our object so start we're just going to set up a basic material we're going to select our blade right here and then go down to our material tab and just set this up if you don't see a material here all you have to do is just i'm going to go ahead and click x and then i'm just going to click new to start with the fresh material if you already see material there you can just stick with that one i'm going to go ahead and go to base color and then assign a texture this is the same exact thing that we did with our minecraft scene so i'm going to go to image structure and then i'm going to navigate to my after open button right here i'm going to navigate to architecture and then just apply uv checkers.jpg to that that'll be in the downloads below so whenever we apply it we don't see anything yet right because we're currently in solid mode and we talked a bit about this before if we switch to rendered mode we can now start to see this texture applied but the problem with this is that we don't actually want to do a render calculation because it is pretty heavy so what we're going to do is we're going to stay in solid mode we're going to choose these options down here so if we come in here you know when we did our runners tab up here we played with this before where we turned on our scene world and hdris and all that but this dialog box changes for each mode we're on here so i'm going to click here on solid mode and then go up here to these options and it'll control these are basically our viewport display options right here so if i long story short there's a lot of really good stuff in here what we want to do now is just click this little texture icon right here and i'll just make sure that we can see that in the viewport so you can see now okay this is clearly broken the the checkered don't look like they're supposed to right i'm going to go to material here and i'm just going to go ahead and rename this to be checkers so our material is going to be called tractors and then what we do now is just assign this to the rest of the object so i'm going to select my guard hit material click check checkers select this i'm going to go ahead and cue frame selected zoom in here and then select our checkers material for that and then continue that all the way up and there we go and now you can see okay now we got a wide range of results right this one's super stretched that one's super straps this one's kind of looks okay this one looks a little better we have a lot of random stuff happening here right so why are some of these looking okay and why or not well this was just a cylinder that we started with and if we apply or if we just add in some primitive shapes just gonna go to odd add up here and mesh we'll just go to cube and then i'll go ahead and move this over and then i'll go ahead and add mesh and then go to cylinder so i'm going to also assign our checkers material to this to that one and then this one so primitive shapes and blender whenever we go to add mesh crates they're going to come with some sort of uvs and usually the problem isn't there until we start modifying these right so you can see our handle right here we didn't do that much modifications so it doesn't look too bad our guard though we did a lot of modifications so it looks pretty bad same thing with our blade here and then our paul mill up here too we got all this stretching and stuff happening in there so this is what we want to do for the next couple of chapters is learn how to just get this checkerboard texture to look correct before we can then move on to our textures and shaders i'm going to start working on that next for me the toughest part about learning 3d modeling when i first started was following along with the video it was very easy to miss this button very easy to miss that button and before you know you have to stop rewind and struggle to find just the next step to the process this is a brutally exhausting process which is why we at cgfastrack.com built the step-by-step screenshot application and we put it into every single one of our courses this would have saved me so much time and frustration and makes it so much easier and enjoyable to learn 3d animation after you're done watching the video here on youtube click the link in the description and follow along there so our goal right now is to begin working on our sword uvs and to get our checkerboard shader to look like this so everything's going to be nice and square and the numbers are all right so to get started with our uvs i'm going to go ahead and select my handle right here and what i do is go over to my uv editing tab right up here and basically what we're going to find in here is that we get access to this uv view and this is you know any one of these tabs up here these are basically just customized versions of the interface so we could technically do all of these tasks in layout view but some of these specifically uv editing and shading that we're going to get into are really nice presets that i use a lot so i find myself using this uv editing tab a lot so first off whenever we jump over we notice one thing we're currently in edit mode right so it is automatically putting us into edit mode just by switching over here so whatever we have selected we're going to be automatically editing right so what do our uvs look like here um if we go to select and we'll just do select all or you can hit a on your keyboard we will now see over here that we have our uvs and they're a little bit hard to see basically i'll give you guys a tour of what we're looking at it's gonna be a little bit easier though if we go ahead and just clear out this texture so by default it's just gonna display whatever texture we have on the viewport i'm gonna go ahead and just exit out of this so we can just start from scratch there we go so now we can see okay whatever we had selected here is now going to display over here if i deselect over here we see nothing if i do select select all we see okay there's our uv so this is the 3d version of the object this is the 2d version of the object so very much like modeling when we model around and do our extrusions our bevels and all that we have to do is similar operations but they're going to be in our uv view both combination of 3d view and the uv view so if i go and just hit tab just to get back into object mode you'll see okay now they disappear if i go into edit mode there they are same thing if i go down here to my guard if i hit select my guard go to tab and then a to select all we see okay now we have our 2d version of that and same thing rather blade if i hit tab hit a to select all we'll see okay whatever we have selected here is going to display over here and this is essentially why things look broken i'm going to go ahead and turn on my display for our textures in this view as well so um why are we doing this twice whoops i'm just going to hit texture there why are we doing this twice all these viewport settings right here are going to be different in every single tab that we're in so this is its own display its own interface and sews this as well so whatever we do we want to have this texture on over here as well so we can see that so a quick tour of how we're going to actually be editing this we're not going to be using this menu right here like we were last time we're also not going to be using a lot of these menus up here what we are going to be using is the uv tab right here and if you can't see this you know things can get a little bit tight over here i'm using middle mouse button you can see me right here middle mouse button to scroll through here like this so the menus that we're going to be spending a lot of time in are going to be this uv menu right here and then this uv menu over here over here this view select these are going to be similar menus of what we have been working with so we'll be getting in these two a little bit it's probably going to be uv view or uv menu right here and uv menu right here and then of course you know we have our display tools right here same thing right there so move rotation scale all those things are going to be very similar in both of these so if i were to do something like this where if i you know i'm editing my sword for example if i come in here and then i come over here and i just go to my selection tool up here and just click and drag and select and i can just go to my move tool right here you can see okay i can move around these uvs and as i move them you can see the texture is going to be moving as well because we are moving the uvs around therefore the texture is going to move as well right so that was a broad look at uvs and in the next chapter we're actually going to start fixing some of these uvs starting with our handle so our goal right now is to fix and adjust the uvs for our handle right here and you can see here how they're nice and square that's what we want to do so to give myself some more work i'm just going to go ahead and move this properties window all the way over right here just to give myself some more room to work and i'm going to select my handle right here hit tab to go in edit mode and then hit a to select all so this one's a good one to start with because it started with the cylinder the uvs aren't bad they're just stretched so how do we fix this stretching right here well we can go over here to our uv view and actually fix them so we want to do up here is go ahead while we have remove tool or actually we'll go into our scale tool right here and we'll just click and drag to select all these uvs now you can see okay we can move this around we can scale this around so we want to do right now is scale the uv specifically right here and what you'll see okay now we have actually control to make these uvs square right so we want this square right here to be as square as possible we'll just go ahead and adjust our scale like this and some controls when you're working in here these are going to be very very similar to our viewport um middle click shift middle click over to move around and pan around and then middle mouse to scroll in and out so you can see my hotkeys down here if i just do shift middle click or just middle click for that matter and then middle mouse scroll in and out so i'll go ahead and make those as square as possible somewhere right in there that's looking pretty good great and then we'll go ahead and now we'll do uh the base of the handle up here so this is definitely going to be part of the pommel i'll go ahead and jump out of edit mode here we'll go to object mode and then we'll switch over to our palmetto up here and we'll select that and then hit tab to go into edit mode now this one's gonna be a little bit different if we hit select a to select all we'll see that okay now we have three different objects we got this one we got this one and we got this one what's going on here so this is because we had a taurus a cylinder and another taurus so we want to do is go over here and we want to fix this so hit a over here to select all or just select and or just go to select and then select all and then we'll do the same thing over here we'll go to select select all or just hit a so now what we want to do is we just want to spread these out so if we go to uvs and then we go to uv pack islands so what is peclets let's see what happens after we hit the spine you'll see now after we hit that uv pack islands it takes all those different islands also just islands are basically these things anything anytime an object doesn't touch another object in uv space it's not technically connected those are going to be the islands so because these are three different objects technically we have three different eyelines so that's just going to flatten that out now what we have the ability to do is to scale these just like we did before so if i while i have my scale tool here if i just deselect nothing i can select this and i'll go to select select linked and then we'll do linked and that's just going to make sure that we have all that selected and we can see here okay while we have this selected um now what we can do is just scale this around and after you scale a couple times you'll see okay what am i looking at right here you can actually see down here as i scale this around it's this bottom one right here so what we want to do here is just scale that to make sure that those are going to be square so you might have to do a little bit of guessing to see which ones they're going to be so you notice as i stretch this one out just went in those are looking much better there we go so those are going to be square now now we're going to do the same thing with the top one right here so select this so click and drag whoops i'll click and drag select select length and then linked it's going to select everything and we'll do the same thing here we'll just squash this in stretch this out like that focusing on making this up here square that's looking pretty good i'm not going to be too overly concerned with the overlapping here i'm just going to select this right here just like that those first on there we'll do select and then select length linked there we go and we'll go ahead and do the same thing i'll go ahead and stretch this out to be square something like that so now that all of them are looking square what we want to do is repack these so if we just hit a to select all then we'll go to uv pack islands now you see here okay now we're getting something a little bit better uh specifically now things are going to be not overlapping right but something's up um the scale is off you can see these checker boards are going to be bigger than these checkerboards right there so we want to do is uv and underneath pack islands we'll do average island scale and that that button isn't perfect all the times but sometimes you know i would say bulk of the time it does a pretty good job so from here we'll just go ahead and then do uv pack islands again to repack that so now we can see okay this square right here and that square right there are looking a lot closer okay so we have two objects done so we'll start moving on to the guard next so with the guard we have an interesting problem and that's the fact that it's currently set up to have the mirror modifier so you can see here the six right here looks correct over here it looks backwards so that's a problem so we have to actually do here if we go into edit mode you'll see okay we only have half an object right so if it's being mirrored the uvs are going to be mirrored as well right so we have to do is we have to collapse our modifiers so what does that mean so i'm going to go to my modifier tab over here i'm going to go ahead and give myself some more room so i got my modifiers tab right here and i got my mirror modify up here this is a procedural action which means it's happening on top of our mesh right so this is our original mesh and then basically in edit mode we have access to half of it because in object mode in object mode the mirror modifier is being applied so we never have access to this mirror while we're in edit mode just because it's being performed on top of this right so what we have to do here is collapse this so while we're in object mode up here we have to go up this little dialog box up here with our new mirror and hit apply if you're in edit mode you will not be able to do this you can apply modifiers while you're in edit mode so we have to go to object mode and then apply what that's going to do is basically get rid of that but it's going to collapse it into edit mode so now the actual mesh is not mirrored anymore it's just a it's just a full mesh and if i go into edit mode we'll be able to see that a little bit better so now we have two halves here right so that's what we're after so i'm gonna go ahead and give myself some more room expand all of that by clicking and dragging great and then now we wanna apply some uvs so this one's a little bit more difficult you know because our uvs are basically destroyed and this happened because we you know we started with the cylinder then we extruded those out and basically from there on there's going to be no working uvs left right so we have to create these from scratch so we're going to just barely touch the surface of this uv menu here it's just enough information for us to get started so our goal right now is isn't to make the most perfect gps that's not that's not what we're doing here our goal is just simply to make our first model right so um there's a lot of really good tools specifically that we go over in blender uv fundamentals but for now we're just going to stick with smart uv project and smart uv bridge is just basically an automatic way to use uvs for very very simple things it can be okay for more complicated things you have to kind of get into the rest of these tools so what we're going to do is hit smart uv project and what we'll do is you know just all these default values we don't really know what these do yet so we'll just hit okay and there we go right off the bat we get a pretty decent solution um the squares are looking square the numbers are going the right way you know they're going like the wrong direction here but generally speaking that's okay so for this one this is going to work totally fine so what we're going to do now is go into object mode and then go over to our blade here and i'm going to select that in object mode hit tab and then select a for everything or just go up to select select all um select select all up here and then what we're going to do is uv smart uv projector we're going to see something interesting happening here i'm going to just do default values again and we'll talk about these as we go hit okay and there we go now we'll see it didn't quite turn out right what is happening here there's a couple different things that are happening first off we need to address the stretching problem you can see here that this does not look like the right shape of this right so what is happening here right if we go to our guard so i'll go in object mode up here i'm going to select my guard go to edit mode we'll see okay these shapes well generally speaking look like the right shapes they look like the shapes that we have here so this shape right here is generally speaking matching the shape right here so what's happening here well we talked a little bit about this earlier but if i go into my object transforms over here go into my object properties we'll see that our pesky scale is not one and one and one and we talked a bit about this with our apply scale so if i go to object apply and then apply scale what that's going to do is make sure all these scale values are one and not those weird arbitrary values that we set before why is that important well whenever we do our uv operations in edit mode along with really any modeling operation this scale value is happening after all this is applied so what that means is this is all going to be stretched because we were stretching it over here right so blender thought this was just a cube and it wasn't a cube it was more of like a rectangle basically so now what we can do is just simply uv and then smart uv project and we'll just hit okay and now we'll see okay it's looking better but it still feels stretched what's going on here well let's go ahead and i'll just do uv smart uv project we have a couple different options here we have correct aspect ratio and stretch to uv balance right here what we want to do is uncheck this stretch tv bounce what that is doing is forcing this thing to take up this entire square which we don't want right we want this thing to be we want the checkerboard to be square so uncheck that hit okay and there we go so now you can see this shape and this shape are relatively the same right and you can see these are now squares which is what we're after now this is something we'll talk about in a later course but basically we have all this negative space over here which isn't the best thing basically uh long story short you have like a 4k texture or whatever there's a lot of empty space here and generally speaking you want to utilize that um for what we're doing right now this is totally fine for what we're doing we're just going to leave it here great so now we have almost all the way done and then the last one we want to do is right up here with our palm l we'll do that next so now we need to fix our paw mel up here we're going to fix this object right there and it's going to be our last object so if i go to edit mode you'll see here okay we have our mirror again so we want to collapse that i'll go to my modifier here go to my mirror and then go to apply and make sure i'm in object mode here and then just hit apply and there we go now we're going to do an edit mode there we go we have our collapsed mirror modifier so you can see here we're getting some stretching already so we want to make sure that we apply our scale so go to object mode again so i'm going to make myself some more room here so we can see so i'm in object mode object and then apply scale great and then now what i'm going to do is go into edit mode again i'm going to select everything by hitting a and then just go up to uv and then smart uv project and we're gonna see we have a couple different problems with this one i'm just gonna use the values that we have been hit okay now you can see okay this is looking okay but as soon as i go into object mode again we'll see we have a lot of different stretching happening here written this stuff up in here this stuff happening here what is this well if we go to our modifier stack here we have our subdivision modifier and if you notice we haven't edit mode is turned off which means we cannot see what the subdivision modifier is doing in edit mode so that's why it's looking different in edit mode versus object mode right so long story short our cage mesh here is essentially collapsing in on itself the way we model this isn't perfect um and the way what's happening here is essentially this is moving upwards here this is moving downwards here long story short there's some modeling techniques that we could potentially add in here that would solve this specifically adding some more holding edges which would prevent it from collapsing on itself but as a quick solution what we can do here is simply collapse this modifier as well so we don't want to do the whole thing we just want to do one subdivision so i'll set this to one and then levels of viewport i'll go to my tab object and then hit apply so why am i setting this to one um basically that you can see here how this looks a little bit more polygonal right there um if i go to two you can see it's getting smooth more we don't necessarily need that um just one will do for now because what we want is simply for this cage mesh to hold its form a little bit more so we'll go ahead and apply this while we're in object mode up here so we'll do apply and now what we can do um so we're in edit mode here we can see that we have that while we're in object mode i'm going to go ahead and do add modifier then do subdivision service and then what this is going to do is now apply that second level of subdivision so our cage mesh is now holding its form a little bit better and we can still subdivide this a little better so i'm going to go ahead and turn this off in edit mode and then go into edit mode again and then what we can do here is now go to i'm going to go ahead and move this over to give myself some more room give myself some more room again and then what we can do here is just uv smart uv project and then hit okay and there we go so now we can see okay now we have some problems here all this stuff is happening you know this doesn't look too great you know what's happening here well the smart uv's project is not perfect not by long shot and if we go in here we have some other options to get some pretty quick and automatic uvs so smart uv projection should be your go-to whenever you're not making custom uvs but a cube projection is another really good one to do which is really just like an automatic projection again these are really automated solutions these are not you know custom uvs which is really important to get into when you cut and all that um we're going to keep things super simple for now so we'll just do cube projection and what you'll see here is okay over here it just dumped everything on top of each other but if we look over here these are all looking pretty good not too bad right i'm certainly better than what we had before so now what we need to do is fix this over here so that this isn't sitting on top of itself and they're all laid out nice and clean the reason why we do that basically we don't want the same textures sitting on top of each other that's going to be important when we get into shading so we do over here is just select everything and then go to uv and then we'll just do pack eye lines again so anything that isn't connected it's just going to lay out flat just like that and now we have that and we'll wrap it up right there so that's looking pretty good again is this perfect uvs um definitely not it's just our first asset we're keeping things very simple just so we can get the bigger picture workflow down and now in the next chapter we'll go ahead and start looking at the shader editor and start applying textures and shaders so here's where we're at we're going to take our uvd model and we're going to apply these textures and shaders so before we jump in to the original scene this is the final result that i have here so i just want to break down what we're going to be working on so you can see here we got like this grungy metallic shader we have this roon effect here um we have this rune effect there we got this different handle material that's all the stuff that we're going to be focused on now so to get started we're going to take a look at the shading view tab right over here so shading tab what is shading tab so so before we move any further what i'm going to do is just select my cylinder over here select my cube head x and then delete and then we're going to do is zoom in here and key frame selected on my guard here and then we're going to look at this right here and we're just going to talk about what we're looking at here so this right here is what we call our shading network that is what the shading tab is referring to right here again this is a custom display that we have here all set up for this we have our viewport right here the only thing different about this is that we're in this material preview mode so material preview mode is similar to like solid mode right we have rendered mode the only difference is it's like an in between it's not going to be our final render it's not going to be our preview but it's going to be a way for us to see our materials and our shaders and our textures in a quick and efficient way so you can see we have our hdri set up so we talked a bit about those before really useful and it just gives us a way to very clearly see our object we got our object menu up here all that's going to be the same we have our properties over here outliner which we'll talk about in a bit and then over here we have two different things this is going to be just a quick way for us to display our textures which we're not going to really use here i do use this but we're going to skip over from for now um and this is going to be our texture view as well um we're going to skip over this one as well and we're just going to mainly focus on this right here and this right here but before we get into here let's explain what we're looking at right here so um this is checkers right here right so we've know what this is before if we come down here to our material tab we notice we have checkers right there so that is the checkers material that we made before and now we're seeing it over here right so this network right here is a node-based way to do exactly what we're doing down here in our material tab right so back when we were adding in our textures when we you know added in the uv checkers.jpg whenever we you know adjusted our minecraft textures this is all of that in a node-based form so what is nodebase basically what that means is instead of you know working in this stacked view we're going to work in this node view which is basically these things right here and you can see how like they're all networked together which we're going to talk about so let's break down what we're seeing here in our shading view in our shading node graph right here so these are nodes and nodes if you've never worked with them before they're a completely different world so you have layer based applications like photoshop and then we have our 3d viewport which is basically a bunch of nodes that are actually just displayed in 3d form and down here we have our shading view which is comprised of nodes so you can think of this down here as like kind of working in photoshop but it's no longer layers but it's going to be networks of things so we have our uv checkers.jpg our principled bsdf and our material output what are these things so this is our texture this is our shader and this is our material what's the difference between these strings so when we built minecraft we talked about materials we talked about textures we talked about how we you know we can assign a texture to a material and that's going to give us our minecraft you know we can see all that but we haven't really talked about this thing called a shader before so textures are basically going to be you know that 2d image that we assigned to our material but our shader is actually how we control the properties like specularity uh is it metallic is it going to be you know a flat you know more dusty type of material those are what shaders are going to do and when we combine them that's going to make up our material so we have our texture right here we have our shader right here and then our material output you can really think of a material as the container itself it's everything together it's not just a shader it's not just the textures it's all of it together the network itself makes the material alright so in the next chapter we're going to talk about how to actually manipulate this stuff so step one of getting our materials is to go from a flat shader to adding in our grunge maps and our metallic and all that all those properties and then we're going to add in the runes last so sorry we're going to focus on the blade and we're going to create our first shader network so after clicking new on a new shader we get this principled bsdf what is this principle best if i want to expand this so we can see this a little bit more so the main properties that we're going to want to get to know are things like base color which is going to change the actual color for now you know since we're going to be using all the controls over here we don't actually need the properties panel anymore so i'm going to go ahead and move this over like this just to get rid of this to give us more space so we have base color which is going to control that we have things like metallic which is going to be another really important one so as i click and drag this right here we see okay now we're seeing some big changes up here if i rotate around you know we might not see much but if we start playing around with the roughness now say if i go down on the roughness something pretty low we can see okay now we have a metallic material right it feels like metal and since we have our roughness low now what i can do is go down on the metallic you can see okay this feels more diffused something more closer to plastic all the way up feels closer to metal right so roughness is the other really really big important one this is going to be basically the blurriness of the reflections which we're going to be using a lot and then down here all the way we have emission which is basically if we click this go into our color wheel here and go up on the value right here we can have you know is this glowing or is it not so that's how we make a glow material so there's a lot of other really important ones specifically next up would be bump we're not going to be using a bump at all in this shader network so we're just going to focus on those ones to get started now i'm going to go ahead and zoom in up here just so we can see this a little bit better and the first thing you want to do is implement a grunge map and a grudge map is going to help the metallic feel like it's worn down so all these textures that we're going to be using are going to be located in the downloads below under sword textures so i'm going to do is just copy this path download those copy this path wherever you have it on your computer and what we're going to do is simply go to add and then we're going to go to texture then we're going to go to imaged texture right there and that's going to be the same image texture that we've been working with with our minecraft with our checkered all of that i'm going to click that and then we're going to have our attached to our cursor and we're going to click down just like that to drop it i'm going to go ahead and open and then i'm gonna go and find my textures and i want to do is grab my scratches right here and our scratch map is just gonna look like this right here just a bunch of scratched metal surfaces so i'm going to scratch this.jpeg i'm going to hit open and there we go so now what i'm going to do here is just drag and drop the color into the roughness why am i doing on the roughness because we want to break up the reflection we want to break that up so it feels um so it's not so clean right but we have a problem right here we know we have these scratches and everything but it doesn't feel as broken up as it should be right so if i to come down here to my color space and switch this over to non-color we're going to see this magical thing happen which is all of a sudden this thing feels much much more believable we see all these details what's going on here so by default this color space is set to rcrgb and we switched over to non-clear why basically long story short there's a really long complicated explanation on color spaces and all that uh the reason for this that i'm going to give you right now is just simply whenever we have a color here if it goes into base color we just want to leave these to be default srgb and whenever we have a color going into anything else we want to switch this over to non-color again there's a super complicated reason i'm going to skip over on why that is but long story short non-color for non-color slots and then for color up here if you're putting that in the base color then you want to stick it on srgb so this is looking pretty good we have a couple more nodes that we want to get to specifically if we want to scale these scratches up and down that's going to be called tiling so we're going to be calling this tiling or texture the nodes we need this for our mapping so we're going to add we're going to go to vector and we're going to come down here to mapping so what is this mapping node basically what this does is i'm going to put this vector into vector what this does is basically controls how many times we're going to see this but you notice as soon as we plug that in it becomes broken and becomes very you know we don't see our texture anymore this is because the mapping node needs to communicate with our uvs the same uvs we were working with in our uv editing tab so we need to do here is go to add we'll go to input and then we'll go to uv map we're going to click this down and we'll drag and drop uvs into vector so now we got our network all hooked up so let's break down what we're seeing here so basically the way it's working is we have an input from our uvs so basically our object right here is being sent into our network right here to bring in to basically import our uvs and then that's going to go through our mapping and our mapping is going to control how big these how essentially scalar the uvs are so if we do something like this where we do something like 2 and 2 down here into scale you see it becomes smaller right and then we have that controlling our texture and then we have that going into our principled bstf which is our uh shader which is going to control things like reflectivity and whatnot and then we're setting that into our material output and that's going to be our very first shader network so in the next chapter we'll start customizing this for the rest of our shooters so we'll start duplicating our blade shader and we're going to make the guard and the handle in the palmelle shooters so i'm going to go ahead and select my guard up here and then we're going to do here is assign the blade shader to this i'm not going to manipulate this at all though because i'm going to duplicate this now so i'm going to hit that little duplication button right here and then notice our text right here says blade dot zero zero one that's how we know it's been duplicated so i'm just gonna change this over to guard and then all we have to do here is simply change the base color so i'm gonna go ahead and adjust this color right here i'm gonna make this something like a deeper uh brown and i'm just gonna control the saturation a little bit and then darken that value so these are gonna be the final results we'll have those in the screenshots and then from here you see okay our scale is going to be off right the scratches on here are going to be much smaller than what we have here so let's go ahead and adjust those if we go over to our mapping over here if we set this them something like 0.5 and 0.5 so that's you know x y for the texture um all of a sudden then it becomes smaller and that's going to be much much more believable so we'll go ahead and assign this same shader to these up here so go ahead and select our palm l select our shader ray our material assignment here and we'll choose guard and then we'll do the same thing for the tip of the palm mouse so we're going to select that select guard and there we go now we need to adjust this for our handle so we're going to select that and we'll go ahead and select our blade for that again and then we'll do is going to duplicate this again then we'll just go ahead and call this handle so there's a couple different properties that we want to adjust here currently this is metallic we don't really want this we want this to be some sort of you know material that you can grip you can think of this as rubber maybe it's going to be fabric because you know we're not going to get that specific with this we can get kind of creative with it so for example if i just want to come in here and take my metallic and turn it all the way down so now it's going to be a little bit more diffused if i come into my base color tone this down make it something like black it's currently going to be way too sharp this is that scratch map going into roughness and we're going to switch this over to this leadplate.tiff and this is a really good map that i use just for like greasy stuff things that you know fingerprints are going to be on all of that good stuff so i'm just going to go in here and we'll now just swap out the scratches.jpg right here and we can do this just by simply jumping into the file opening image button right here so we can click that we can go ahead and paste that in here i'm going to go in and choose my lead plate.tiff hit open image and immediately you'll start to see okay we're we're better but it's still too clear um this color space automatically gets switched over to srgb so when it switches over to that color and then you're there you'll see okay now this is more looking more like one which is going to be a bit more diffused a bit more believable and then from here what we can do is control the specularity so the specular slide is going to control how reflective it is not in the sense that is it metallic or not but like if it's a if it's a plastic or if it's a rubber or whatever maybe this is going to be how reflective it is so i'm going to make it a bit lower somewhere around 0.25 right there and there we go that's looking pretty good and then in the next chapters we're going to start implementing the glowing runes onto our sword so here's where we're going to start working on the roon glowing setup so we're going to jump into our blade here we're just going to work on the initial node setup so we're going to need this setup right here we're going to need a texture a mapping and uv map so i'm going to instead of building stuff from scratch what i'm going to do is just select this and then ctrl c to copy and then ctrl v to paste now after you paste you won't see anything we have to click and drag down because it's going to paste on top of each other okay so now we have that texture setup all ready to go for us and we're going to do is bring in the roon stencil so i'm going to my file dialog and then i'll go to my downloads my sword textures and then i'll go to my runes.jpg so first off let's go ahead and take a look at our texture here so our rune texture is going to look like this right here um it's just a rune text that's going in this rectangular format so it's not a square texture here and we'll run into a little bit of an issue coming up so what we do here is go ahead and plug this into emission emission is where things glow and immediately we're going to see this right it's this weird stretchy thing so why this why is this happening this is happening because our aspect ratio here for our runes here is not one to one right is this it's this really long rectangular shape normally i would have you know this just on a texture um we're going to keep things simple just use this as it is and what we need to do here is now stretch this mapping out to compensate for that and what we want to do here with this scale right here is have this be somewhere around an 8 to 1 aspect ratio so we'll do size and x eight and then we'll do one and y and then what we need to do is rotate this because currently it's going vertically which we do not want we want to go um horizontally so we'll switch this over to 90 degrees in our z-axis and there you go now we're starting to see stuff happen right so it's currently it's not enough the size isn't right so we have to do is go up on the scale here and what i'm going to do is simply just go somewhere like 80 and 10 right here and then you see okay now this size is something that we'd expect but it still doesn't feel glowing right so we have two things that we want to do we want to make this texture brighter so we're going to move this over and we're going to do that by hue saturation value notice i'm going to go to add color and then hue saturation now it doesn't say value here but if we click in here and then we'll just click and drop onto our network right there and we'll see that we have a classic hue saturation value node right here and if you're used to photoshop it's the same exact thing now what we want out of this is the value value is brightness so if i do something like 100 here you notice that our runes get brighter right but something missing right we don't have that glow effect so this is where we go into our ev settings here so i'm going to go to my properties over here go up to my eevee dialogue up here and then you know this is where we were messing with like ambient occlusion again evie is going to be the renderer that we're using right here it's what's calculating the reflections and all of that we used ambient occlusion before right um that was with our minecraft and what we're going to do now is use bloom and you can see all of a sudden we have a nice glow setup and if we go down on this values i'm like 50 25 now you can see okay now this feels a lot more believable there we go i'll go ahead and move this back over close the properties up a little bit and then our last thing here is going to be to colorize this what we're going to do is add an add we'll go to color and we'll do the mix rgb and then again we'll go ahead and drag and drop this over our network right here just like that and there we go now what we want to do here is colorize this and we're going to set the blending mode so if you're used to photoshop for example this is blending modes just like photoshop and what we want to do is set this to multiply why we set it to multiply basically what that's going to do is allow us to use this color right here to colorize it we're not seeing much yet but if we go ahead and move this factor all the way up like this this is basically how much is this going to be colorizing this right so we do multiply factor all the way up and then we'll do something like a deep orange color right here and this is where we can since we're kind of darkening it with this colorization what we do is now go really high on this value something like 500 right there and that's it and now what we have to do is actually get this to be in the center of our groove right here so this is going to be our final node network for this one right there and then we're going to start working on the assignment for the middle groove next so now we want to get the runes to actually be in the middle of this groove right here so the first thing i'm going to do to do is set up our assignment and what we're going to do here is instead of having this be over the entire blade what i'm going to do here is now disconnect this emission right and what we need to do here is now do a polygon assignment so i'm going to go to my material setup here and there's going to be something new we haven't actually done this yet so far our object assignments which we've been doing right here so this is how we you know switch out if we want to check ours or if we want the blade that's how we switch out assignments right so now what we need to do is set up assignments on individual polygons themselves so the way we do that i'm going to go into edit mode here i'm going to go into my face selection or by hitting three and what i'm going to do here is select these polygons right here so it should be one two three four five six seven eight eight of those and if i back out here you'll see that okay it's just this right here just these top ones right here so i'm going to go ahead and frame that so i can rotate around this a little bit better and then i'm going to go ahead and do the same thing for the back so i'll do shift click select all of those and then those edges as well and there we go so now we need to do is make an assignment based off of this selection what we're going to do over here is come over to our material slots so this list that we see here what is this thing well basically what we can do is this is what's assigned to the object and if we do this all plus we have the ability to assign something new to the object if i were just to do new right here um currently it's not going to be assigned to anything i'm going to undo out of that hit this little plus icon right here and what i'm going to do here is now hit assign right here what that's going to do is assign this slot to these polygons so this one's going to be assigned to the based object and this one's going to be assigned just to these polygons you can see now it's a different color right so now what we need to do is assign that same blade to this so we have a blade right here we have our new assignment right here and we're going to select blade but we just didn't do anything because we have blades selected here blade's liquid there but now what we can do is duplicate this material i'm going to hit the duplicate button while i'm on this slot right here duplicate and then you notice we got a name change right there and i'm going to go ahead and underscore glow rename it to underscore glow and now what i can do is simply connect this emission so now what's happening here is we have our blade shader right here that's not connected and we had our we have our blade glow shader right here that is connected the same exact material setup um just two different shaders now once connected one isn't now it's still not going to be lined up like we want so we have to go back over here to our tiling right here and this part you know this can be a little bit tricky and again these exact settings that i'm using here might not be exactly what you have because whenever we do the uv projection um it's based off the model and your models might be slightly different you know i we did start with like those exact values but you know things can change over time right so i'm going to show you how to line this up and your settings might be a little bit different so what we need to do here is click and drag here and we can just click on a planner parameter and drag like this to move it the problem right now is that it's moving too fast so we just simply do control shift oops uh alt shift click and drag we'll see okay now we can incrementally move this which is going to be a little bit more manageable i don't know if we can do the y as well so then we can move that over like that so my value is going to be somewhere around you know point negative point five um yours might be different um that all depends and then one note i just want to make right now is that if we go to the back the back's not going to be lined up exactly because you know this value works for over here but it doesn't work over here i'm going to skip over that part because the way we're going to present this is only going to be in the front and realistically i think it's a you know good thing for you guys to see this early on is that you know if we're not going to see the back of it we don't need to worry about it right and the entire cinematic was just running from the front side now if you do want to adjust the back all you have to do is make a new assignment for the back do the same workflow duplicate the shader and then just make new settings so that you end up having three different shaders you have one for the the metallic the one for the glow and one for the back um so we're going to skip over that part and we're going to start doing the paul mel assignment up here to make this glow right there so now we're going to work on our palm setup and make that part glow as well so very similar workflow that we just did i'm going to go ahead and go back to object mode i'm going to select my palm out and then i'm going to go into my shader slot over here go ahead and hit plus and what i'm going to do is go into edit mode and then what i'm going to do here is just simply go into face selection and select these faces right here so i'll do shift selection to select all of that and then a cool workflow that we can do to select the rest of them and simply grow this so if we go select we'll go to more or less and then we'll just do more on this and i'm going to use the hotkey control number pad plus for this so control number pad plus um and you can always see hotkeys here too so if i do select more or less you'll see we have the hotkey listed right there great and then what i'm going to do here is just simply hit um go to my second slot here hit assign and there we go and then i'm just going to go ahead and assign blade glow now very similar to what we talked about before the tiling is not right here so what we have to do is duplicate the shader so i'm going to go ahead and hit this little duplicate shader icon our new shader will be called you know blade glow dot zero and i'm going to go ahead and change this to paul ml underscore glow and now all we need to do is adjust these tiling settings right here until i get this to line up and the scale values that i found that worked for best for this one was just 4 and then 0.25 again that's mostly from experimentation again for you if you want to do this from scratch what you would do is simply just do alt shift click and then scale this like this until you get something that you feel is right and then from here um after we set up those four and .25 um we all we do is just adjust right here so then we have alt shift click right here to click and move that around and we'll do this one as well and you can see the the x is going to be a little bit trickier i find myself you know coming in here and i'll just do like incremental values i'll show you like point zero you know dot zero one and then move it that way it's a little tedious um again there's better ways to do this um basically how i would normally do this would be to just go into photoshop and line it up um but we're going to keep it very simple and very blender centric for this one and there we go now we have that assigned right there now if we wanted to do the back as well we could do that as well so i'll go to the back here and i'll do a section here i'll do select all the way around and then i'll simply grow that selection again so select more or less more and i'll use the control number pad plus hotkey to do this again a couple times and i'll simply go to my blade glow right here and then i'll do my assignment right there and then i'll what i'm going to do is make sure i rename that looks like it didn't actually get renamed before so do paul ml glow and there we go and again if we wanted to do have this aligned perfectly what i would do there is just simply do a new assignment duplicate the shader and do that again since we're only going to be presenting it from the front i'm just going to worry about making the front look good right now if you render your sword it's going to look something like this which is why in part three we're going to go over cinematic rendering techniques and build off the environment to our scene be sure to show us your work with hashtag cgfastrak and now it's time to build out our environment

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